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newborn_raccoons

Found an obviously injured animal? Not sure if the baby animal you found is in need of help? Have wild animals nested unwanted in your home? Let us help you take care of it efficiently and humanely. Scroll down for more info.

 

IZZIE’S POND

Izzie’s Pond is a non-profit organization under section 501(c)(3) of the United States Internal Revenue Code. All donations to Izzie’s Pond are deductible. Our tax identification number is 80-0922846.

Izzie’s Pond Emergency Hotline:

864-303-6171

Universal Guidelines

While care is often species-specific, here are three rules to follow no matter what species you find:

DO NOT give food or water to any wild animal.

We know this seems counterintuitive, especially for an animal that looks hungry or thirsty. However, every situation is different. Internet instructions cannot account for every situation, so feeding or watering an animal can actually add a secondary source of harm and make it harder for us to assess the animal’s condition.

DO NOT try to raise the animal yourself.

State and federal laws against raising or keeping wild animals without appropriate permits isn’t just government bureaucracy; they’re designed to protect both you and the animals.

Raising a wild animal is difficult to do without proper training. Each year we take in wild babies who later die because their keepers didn’t have the medications, antibiotics, or nutrition they needed.
Wild animals raised incorrectly by untrained individuals often result in human habituated animals that don’t fit in — either with people, or their own species. They need to be raised with their own species.
The cutest and cuddliest animals can still carry viruses and parasites that could harm you, your children, or your pets. An experienced wildlife rehabber can determine if an animal is sick and has the resources readily available to give the expert care that animal requires and needs.

CALL BEFORE you bring an animal to Izzie’s Pond.

This page offers information on how to tell if an animal needs help. However, whether you’ve identified that animal definitely needs rescue, or you just aren’t sure, please call us BEFORE you move the animal.

Be sure to text us pictures of the animal and any injuries, and be prepared to offer details about its situation (presence of other animals nearby, overall condition, etc.) We will also be able to advise you on the best way to pick up and transport the animal safely and with the lowest risk of injury to you and it.

IZZIE’S POND

Izzie’s Pond is a non-profit organization under section 501(c)(3) of the United States Internal Revenue Code. All donations to Izzie’s Pond are deductible. Our tax identification number is 80-0922846.

Izzie’s Pond Emergency Hotline:

864-303-6171

What To Do IF

IZZIE’S POND

Izzie’s Pond is a non-profit organization under section 501(c)(3) of the United States Internal Revenue Code. All donations to Izzie’s Pond are deductible. Our tax identification number is 80-0922846.

Izzie’s Pond Emergency Hotline:

864-303-6171

I found a duckling/gosling

injured_ducklingIf you have found a single duckling or gosling all alone, a small duckling or gosling that still has down shouldn’t be far from its mother, and there are very few situations where a mom will be separated from her baby. Most of the time, a lone baby was either dumped by a human, or was a late hatch. In either case, the baby needs to come to us.

If you have found an injured duckling or gosling, still with it’s family, keep in mind that protective parental geese may attack you (the predator) if you try to approach an injured baby, with the father being the most aggressive. Family ties with geese are very strong and they don’t realize that you are trying to help. It is best to have 2 people in these instances, one person can hold up a towel or sheet to block while the other person grabs the baby.

Mothers leave the nest within 3 days of the babies hatching to avoid attracting predators. She will then lead the babies to water, which can be up to 2 miles away. If one or more eggs hatch after the family has left, the mother will not return for any late babies, nor will she recognize these as her babies if you take them to her. Unless you actually saw a baby get separated from its mother and can identify her among a group of ducks or geese, NEVER try to reunite a baby with a parent. Trying to reunite with the wrong parent can get the duckling or gosling killed.

In this situation, please call us ASAP for assistance. It can be hard to tell the difference between an abandoned domestic duckling or gosling, and an orphaned wild bird. It’s against state and federal law for you to keep a wild bird and try and raise it yourself, so get in touch — and be sure to text us a picture of the baby!

IZZIE’S POND

Izzie’s Pond is a non-profit organization under section 501(c)(3) of the United States Internal Revenue Code. All donations to Izzie’s Pond are deductible. Our tax identification number is 80-0922846.

Izzie’s Pond Emergency Hotline:

864-303-6171

Is the duckling/gosling hurt?

Even if mom is around, an injured baby is in need of immediate medical assistance. Please call us ASAP for assistance and be ready to text us a picture of the baby and its injuries.

If you know that a cat has caught the baby, bring the baby to us immediately. Cat saliva is toxic to small animals, and any baby that has been in a cat’s mouth needs to be on antibiotics within 24 hours of the attack.

The baby seems injured, but I can’t tell how badly.
Birds hide their illnesses for as long as possible to avoid predation, so when you see one acting sick, it is often in need of emergency care.

If you can capture the baby, place it in a well ventilated box with a cover. Place towels or a blanket in the box, with a warm rice sock, or place half on/ half off a heating pad on the lowest setting. Keep the box in a quiet place, away from people or other animals. Do not allow your children to play with the babies.

Be careful not to stress the animal; it could die from too much stress. Young babies are fragile and just an hour could mean the difference between life and death.

When you call us:

  • We’ll need your name, phone number, address, and location of the animal.
  • Tell us whether the animal is in your possession and contained, or still running free.
  • Tell us what age you think it is.
  • If it’s a baby, has it been abandoned, or is the mother nearby?
  • Tell us whether the animal is in immediate danger.
  • If it’s injured, tell us its apparent injuries.
  • If possible, text us pictures of the animal.

Again, give no water or food! Feeding the wrong food, or feeding an animal that is dehydrated or in shock, can be fatal.

IZZIE’S POND

Izzie’s Pond is a non-profit organization under section 501(c)(3) of the United States Internal Revenue Code. All donations to Izzie’s Pond are deductible. Our tax identification number is 80-0922846.

Izzie’s Pond Emergency Hotline:

864-303-6171

I found a solo duck or goose

jefflynch2Paired male and female ducks and geese separate in spring so that the females can nest. Male geese remain nearby their mates so that they can defend their nests, while male ducks remain near their “home” body of water.

This is partly a defense to avoid attracting predators, and is male behavior that lasts for about 28 days until the eggs hatch. Females, on the other hand, incubate their eggs nearly all the time. Both ducks and geese only leave the nest to quickly get food/water, usually early in the morning and late in the evening.

If you see a goose alone, take the time to observe it first. A goose that stands up using both legs and doesn’t have obvious injuries, such as a bleeding wound or a wing dragging, is fine. Our first preference is always to keep bird families together.

What if the duck or goose is injured?

Please approach the bird slowly before calling us. Be ready to send text messages with pictures of the injury, and please be prepared to bring the animal to Izzie’s Pond. To do this, you’ll need a well ventilated box with a cover. Place towels or a blanket in the box, with a warm rice sock, and be careful not to stress the animal; it could die from too much stress.

What if the duck or goose is in a dangerous location?

Common locations for wild geese and ducks to be found include parking lots, on roadway medians, and other unusual places. Although wild geese and ducks can fly to escape “predators” such as vehicles, they may underestimate an approaching vehicle’s speed. They are also in danger when they leave the nest with ducklings or goslings, who must be walked to water.

However, moving protected migratory bird species requires a permit from the US Fish and Wildlife Service. It’s better to find a way to protect the animals and their nest.

A lone wild goose found near the road can sometimes mean that the mate has been hit or killed. Geese mate for life, and often isolate themselves when grieving. Like humans often do, they may return to the side of the road where their loved ones lost their lives.

If you can see a carcass, you can remove it. This usually helps the mate to leave the area. However, we will not move an uninjured grieving animal unless it is in imminent danger. Geese, like humans, must grieve in their own way; it will not help to relocate the goose, even to a new flock.

How do I catch a goose or duck?

Often, ducks or geese can be lured away from the water with food.

  • Dropping small amounts and luring the animal away from the shoreline will be the best way to start.
  • Get between the water and the animal, and slowly walk, never chase, the animal to herd it in the direction you want it to go.
  • Look for barriers to use to your advantage, such as fence lines, buildings or natural barriers that can serve as a way to corner the animal.
  • Long poled fishing nets make the bird easier to capture, but a towel or sheet will work fine. Toss the sheet or towel over the bird, and wrap around the wings, lightly covering the head, careful to not cover too tightly so the bird can still breath. Wrapping and covering will keep the animal calmer and will be easier to carry.
  • Once wrapped, you can carry the duck or goose football style, while holding the feet if they’re not wrapped in the towel. Doing it this way insures no one gets bitten or scratched.

Again, keep in mind, they don’t realize you’re trying to help and to them, you’re the predator they must escape from.

I own a business, andjeff_lynch_geese a protective mate is bothering my customers.

Geese only nest for about a month, so this is a temporary situation. However, if it is a problem, please call us for advice on how to put up a barrier around the nest (it will be obvious where the nest is). You can also post a warning sign like the one seen in the image. Download your copy to print here!

If you’d prefer to prevent nesting, you can modify the environment to make it less appealing. If you see a pair starting a nest, you can destroy the nest so they will move. However, once the nest is built and an egg is laid, it is illegal to tamper with it and the nest must be left alone.

IZZIE’S POND

Izzie’s Pond is a non-profit organization under section 501(c)(3) of the United States Internal Revenue Code. All donations to Izzie’s Pond are deductible. Our tax identification number is 80-0922846.

Izzie’s Pond Emergency Hotline:

864-303-6171

Ducks or geese are attacking other birds at a pond

injured_duckSadly, although it is illegal for people to dump unwanted domestic ducks and geese at ponds owned by businesses or HOAs, they still do it. These birds are not prepared to live on their own in the wild, and wild birds as well as other predators take advantage of that.

Call us immediately if you see one or more animals attacking another. Be prepared to send us video, and if possible, to capture and transport the animals yourself.

When you call us:

  • Tell us whether the animal is in your possession and contained, or still running free.
  • Tell us what age you think it is.
  • If it’s a baby, has it been abandoned, or is the mother nearby?
  • Tell us whether the animal is in immediate danger.
  • If it’s injured, tell us its apparent injuries.
  • If possible, text us pictures of the animal.

Again, give no water or food! Feeding the wrong food, or feeding an animal that is dehydrated or in shock, can be fatal.

I think humans are attacking ducks or geese at a pond.

If you see human-on-animal abuse, please know that this is a crime in the State of South Carolina. Call police, and if animals have been injured, have the police contact us to rehabilitate the animals.

IZZIE’S POND

Izzie’s Pond is a non-profit organization under section 501(c)(3) of the United States Internal Revenue Code. All donations to Izzie’s Pond are deductible. Our tax identification number is 80-0922846.

Izzie’s Pond Emergency Hotline:

864-303-6171

I found a baby mammal

newborn_raccoonsRaccoons, opossums, squirrels, deer, and many other Upstate mammal species all have their babies in spring and raise them throughout summer! You may encounter babies on your property or in public spaces when they nest in your attic, shed, or boat; when mothers “park” their babies for safety while they forage; or even when the animal’s nesting spot is damaged in any way.

If you’ve found one or more baby raccoons, opossums, squirrels, fawns, foxes, skunks, or birds, please refer to the Humane Society of the United States’ excellent page, “How to Help Orphaned or Injured Wildlife.” If, after using this page, you’ve determined that the baby does need help, please contact us immediately!

When you call us:

  • Tell us whether the animal is in your possession and contained, or still running free.
  • Tell us what age you think it is.
  • If it’s a baby, has it been abandoned, or is the mother nearby?
  • Tell us whether the animal is in immediate danger.
  • If it’s injured, tell us its apparent injuries.
  • If possible, text us pictures of the animal.

Again, give no water or food! Feeding the wrong food, or feeding an animal that is dehydrated or in shock, can be fatal.

IZZIE’S POND

Izzie’s Pond is a non-profit organization under section 501(c)(3) of the United States Internal Revenue Code. All donations to Izzie’s Pond are deductible. Our tax identification number is 80-0922846.

Izzie’s Pond Emergency Hotline:

864-303-6171

I have unwanted wild animals on my property

raccoon_rakeA wild animal living on your property is a temporary situation! This is the first and most important thing to know. You can manage the situation humanely and effectively, without need to trap, kill, or orphan the animals.

With development accelerating throughout our region, many animals will adapt and become “urban wildlife.” They seek warm, safe places to have and raise babies, escape predators and bad weather, and that have easy access to food which is no longer as easy to come by.

Before you do anything, we ask you first to assess your situation with wildlife using the 6 steps outlined by the Humane Society of the United States. If you need information for a specific species, the Human Society also offers answers to common wildlife problems.

Know that there are alternatives to live trapping and relocating. Often, you can safely and humanely coexist with your wild neighbors! Get to know your wild neighbors and please consider learning how to create a DIY humane backyard.

Finally, if you have pets, make sure your dog or cat’s rabies vaccination is up-to-date. Rabies vaccines must be administered once per year. Feed your pets indoors rather than outdoors, or offer food closer to your property boundary if you don’t mind feeding wildlife but simply don’t want it near your home.

IZZIE’S POND

Izzie’s Pond is a non-profit organization under section 501(c)(3) of the United States Internal Revenue Code. All donations to Izzie’s Pond are deductible. Our tax identification number is 80-0922846.

Locally, Izzie’s Pond works with wildlife specialists who can help you identify how to exclude wildlife from your home and prevent them from coming back. Visit our “Partners” page to find a specialist in your area!

I found a dog, cat, songbird, or rabbit

makeshift_nestIzzie’s Pond cannot rehabilitate all sick and injured animals in the Upstate — but we do belong to an extensive network of rehabbers. Though we may not personally be able to take the animal you have found, we may be able to help you find someone who can.

I found a dog or cat

If you have found a dog or cat, there are many great local rescues that specialize in these animals. Refer to the Petfinder.com website to find contact information for the rescues nearest to you.

I found a songbird

First determine if it needs help:

A bird flew into my window
Often a bird will just be stunned. You should:

  • Put the bird in a covered shoe box with air holes in a quiet dark place away from pets and children.
  • Do not handle the bird otherwise.
  • Wait 2 to 3 hours, and then take the box back outside.
  • Open the box. If the bird cannot fly away and still appears injured, it needs to go to a federally licensed songbird rehabber.

I found a nestling
If you have found an uninjured nestling:

  • Put it back in its nest.
  • If its original nest was destroyed or can’t be reached, make a “nest” out of a hanging basket or strawberry basket. Secure it to the tree as high up and as close to the original nest as you can get.
  • Watch from a distance for at least an hour to make sure its parents come back to feed it.

I found a fledgling
Fledglings will hop around on the ground for several days while parents continue to feed them and teach them to fly. This is a normal process that every bird must go through. If you find an uninjured fledgling in your yard, keep your pets indoors and walk in another area or with a leash until the fledgling has moved on. It doesn’t take long!

However, if the fledgling is injured or if any bird is caught by a cat, due to bacteria in cat saliva, the bird needs antibiotics within the first 24 hours of the attack or it likely will not survive.

A federal permit is necessary to rehab songbirds. Find a licensed rehabber near you by visiting the South Carolina Department of Natural Resource’s wildlife rehabbers registry.

I found a bunny

Bunny nests are often uncovered when people are mowing grass or working in their yards and gardens. Just because you don’t see the mom, doesn’t mean you have found orphans. Mom only comes at dawn and at dusk to feed her babies, and stays away the rest of the time so she doesn’t lure predators to the nest.

If you have found uninjured babies:

  • Gently cover the nest again with grass and leaves.
  • Leave twigs in a tic tac toe pattern over the nest.
  • Check back 12-24 hours later. If the twigs have not been disturbed, you need to find a rehabber.
  • Keep dogs and cats indoors away from the nest.

Baby bunnies leave the nest and are on their own in just 4 short weeks!

If bunny is injured or caught by a cat, due to bacteria in cat saliva, the bunny needs antibiotics within the first 24 hours of the attack or it likely will not survive.

Find a licensed rehabber near you by visiting the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources’ wildlife rehabbers registry.

IZZIE’S POND

Izzie’s Pond is a non-profit organization under section 501(c)(3) of the United States Internal Revenue Code. All donations to Izzie’s Pond are deductible. Our tax identification number is 80-0922846.

Izzie’s Pond Emergency Hotline:

864-303-6171